A Bold New Transportation Vision in 5 Big Moves

Transportation technology is evolving and changing how we travel daily. Embracing these innovations, the 5 Big Moves – Complete Corridors, Transit Leap, Mobility Hubs, Flexible Fleets, and the Next OS –  are transformative strategies that reimagine how our region will grow and how people and goods will get around.


First introduced at joint meeting of the SANDAG Board of Directors, Policy Advisory Committees, and Independent Taxpayer Oversight Committee, the 5 Big Moves will set the framework for a new transportation vision for our region that will enhance connectivity, increase safety and sustainability, and improve quality of life. The 2021 Regional Plan will synchronize the 5 Big Moves to deliver a fully integrated, world class transportation system for the San Diego region.

5 Big Moves Concept Illustrations

Explore these sample scenes to see what features of the 5 Big Moves might look like on a highway, major local street, and in urban or suburban activity centers. Many features could be applied in multiple location types and at varying scales to best fit and serve the surrounding community.

 
 
 

(1/9) Complete Corridors are routes that offer people a variety of travel choices, while using technology to efficiently balance how people use roadways. Major local roads can offer features that are similar to what is offered on highways, but on a smaller scale.

(2/9) Commuter rail separated from road traffic by grade provides high-speed connections between major residential, employment, and activity centers.

(3/9) Bus riders are offered expanded hours and more frequent service times. Dedicated lanes for transit, traffic signals that give transit priority over other traffic, and other treatments make bus travel times more reliable on highways and local streets.  

(4/9) Dedicated walkways, bike lanes, and other infrastructure create a safe and convenient environment for bike riders, pedestrians, and others who choose scooters and other forms of micromobility.

(5/9) Lanes are managed in real time to improve how drivers use the transportation network, while also alerting them to incidents ahead. 

(6/9) Interactive kiosks help riders find, book, and pay for trips across different modes of transportation. Electronic timetables display the latest arrival and departure times for buses and trains. 

(7/9) In the future, inductive charging infrastructure embedded in roadways will keep electric vehicles charged as they travel, extending their range.  

(8/9) Complete Corridors connect to Mobility Hubs - centers of activity where transit, micromobility options such as scooters and small shuttles, and on-demand services such as Uber and Lyft come together to provide a range of transportation choices.

(9/9) On-demand services such as microtransit shuttles and rideshare meet people’s needs for short- and long-distance trips in the region.

(1/9) Complete Corridors are routes that offer people a variety of travel choices, while using technology to efficiently balance how people use roadways. Major local roads can offer features that are similar to what is offered on highways, but on a smaller scale.

(2/9) Commuter rail separated from road traffic by grade provides high-speed connections between major residential, employment, and activity centers. Meanwhile, bus service with expanded hours, more frequent service times, and priority treatments such as dedicated lanes offer more reliable, faster, and safer transit.  

(3/9) Dedicated walkways, bike lanes, and other infrastructure create a safe and convenient environment for bike riders, pedestrians, and others who choose scooters and other forms of micromobility.

(4/9) Lanes are managed in real time to improve how drivers use the transportation network, while also alerting them to incidents ahead. Curb space is managed so people have access to safe and convenient pick-up and drop-off zones.

(5/9) On-street parking spaces are designated for different users throughout the day, based on demand and the hour, to accommodate package deliveries, parking for major events, and other needs. Electronic parking signs display up-to-date  information on the availability of spaces and what they cost.

(6/9) Interactive kiosks help riders find, book, and pay for trips across different modes of transportation. Electronic timetables display the latest arrival and departure times for buses and trains.  

(7/9) In the future, inductive charging infrastructure embedded in roadways will keep electric vehicles charged as they travel, extending their range. Vehicle charging stations will be located throughout the region.  

(8/9) Additional services at Mobility Hubs include signs to help people find their way, package delivery lockers, and mobile retail support. 

(9/9) On-demand services such as microtransit shuttles and rideshare meet people’s needs for short- and long-distance trips in the region. 

(1/8) Mobility Hubs are centers of activity where different modes of transportation and a variety of amenities come together to provide comprehensive transit services in urban and suburban communities.

(2/8) A mix of commercial, residential, and recreational land uses support better access to transit and other community destinations.

(3/8) Commuter rail service, separated from traffic by tunnels or bridges, provides high-speed connections between major residential, employment, and activity centers. Bus riders are offered expanded hours and more frequent service times. Interactive kiosks help riders find, book, and pay for trips across different modes of transportation.

(4/8) Amenities such as seating in shared areas, public WiFi, and access to electricity for charging for mobile devices make waiting for transit or shared rides a more pleasant experience. Roads can be converted temporarily to car-free zones and designated for food, retail, and events.

(5/8) Dedicated walkways, bike lanes, and other infrastructure create a safe and convenient environment for bike riders, pedestrians, and others who choose scooters and other forms of micromobility.  

(6/8) Smart signals at  busy intersections, which control traffic with sensors and artificial intelligence, improve safety and promote the efficient movement of private vehicles, transit, bike riders, and pedestrians. 

(7/8) Flexible spaces used for many different purposes can be places for package delivery lockers, food trucks, drop-off facilities for dry cleaning, and other mobile retail services.  

(8/8) On-demand services such as microtransit shuttles and rideshare help meet people’s needs for short- and long-distance trips in the region.  

(1/5) Mobility Hubs are activity centers where different modes of transportation and a variety of amenities come together to provide comprehensive transit services in urban and suburban communities. 

(2/5) Dedicated walkways, bike lanes, and other infrastructure create a safe and convenient environment for bike riders, pedestrians, and others who choose scooters and other forms of micromobility.

(3/5) Rideables such as scooters and bikes help people complete the final part of their trip and extend the reach of transit. Dedicated parking for shared vehicles makes it easier for people to access them, while separated parking stations for rideables promotes safety.

(4/5) Managing curb space for different times of the day and different levels of traffic can better accommodate all kinds of uses – for people picking up and dropping off passengers, making commercial deliveries, riding bikes, walking, taking transit, or using other types of flexible fleets. 

(5/5) Flexible spaces used for many different purposes can be places for package delivery lockers, food trucks, drop-off facilities for dry cleaning, and other mobile retail services.  


The 5 Big Moves

Click on the image to learn more about each of the 5 Big Moves:

Resources