Mobility Hubs

Mobility hubs are places of connectivity where different modes of travel – walking, biking, transit, and shared mobility – converge and where there is a concentration of employment, housing, shopping, and/or recreation. They provide an integrated suite of mobility services, amenities, and technologies to bridge the distance between high-frequency transit and an individual’s origin or destination.

Sample mobility hub services, amenities, and technologies include: bikeshare, carshare, neighborhood electric vehicles, bike parking, dynamic parking management strategies, real-time traveler information, real-time ridesharing, microtransit services, bike and pedestrian improvements, wayfinding, and urban design enhancements. These features help travelers connect to regional transit services and make short trips within the neighborhood and beyond. Integration of information technology helps travelers find, access, and pay for transit and on-demand shared mobility services. In the future, automated and connected transportation services may enhance mobility for travelers of all ages and abilities while fostering a safer environment for all mobility hub users.

Mobility hubs may result in a number of benefits:

  • Increased transportation choices for residents, employees, and visitors
  • Decreased dependence on the private automobile
  • Reduced traffic congestion

Two planning efforts are underway to apply the mobility hub concept within our region:

Regional Mobility Hub Strategy

Mid-Coast Mobility Hub Implementation Strategy


The Active Transportation layer highlights those roadway enhancements and amenities that create a safe and comfortable place for people biking or walking to transit. The graphic depicts pedestrians walking through raised, high-visibility crosswalks, people riding bikes in protected bike lanes, and a secure group bike parking facility with repair station for users to park and service their bikes.
The Shared Mobility Services layer highlights various on-demand travel options that encourage pooling to reduce drive-alone trips. Shared services include transit, ridehailing options like Lyft or Uber, carshare services like Zipcar, on-demand shuttles, neighborhood electric vehicles, bikeshare including e-bikes, moped scooters, and rideables like razor scooters and hoverboards.
The Support Services layer includes amenities that help make traveling both seamless and convenient. Real-time travel information displays and interactive trip planning kiosks help people connect to transit and a wide range of shared mobility services. Electric vehicle charging stations power both personal vehicles and shared vehicle and scooter fleets. Conveniently located package delivery stations and mobile retail services reduce the need to drive alone to complete daily errands.
The Intelligent Transportation Systems layer depicts how technology can be leveraged to enhance mobility while fostering a safe and convenient environment for all mobility hub users. Example technologies include wireless in-road vehicle charging, smart parking kiosks that facilitate reservation and mobile payment, and autonomous and connected vehicles that communicate with each other and the surrounding infrastructure.
Mobility hubs are places of connectivity where different modes of travel – walking, biking, transit, and shared mobility – come together and where there is a concentration of employment, housing, shopping, and/or recreation. They provide an integrated suite of mobility services, amenities, and technologies to bridge the distance between high-frequency transit and an individual’s origin or destination. This graphic is divided into layers that illustrate the various features that may comprise a mobility hub.